Lift Ev’ry Voice Film Festival – Gone are the Days!

August 4, 2P
Lift Ev’ry Voice Film Festival at the Berkshire Museum – Gone are the Days!  lev4

at the Berkshire Museum, 39 South St, Pittsfield
presented by LEV, Berkshire Museum, Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at BCC

Free. Donations accepted.

This is the third of four film screenings and talkbacks with historian and filmmaker, Don Quinn Kelley, Ph.D., Co-chair, Lift Ev’ry Voice. This is the film version of Ossie Davis’ play, Purlie Victorious, which became the hit Broadway musical, Purlie. A young, idealistic man returns home to the plantation where he grew up in servitude. With him, he brings his fiance, Lutiebelle, in hopes of convincing the plantation owner that she is really his cousin in order to secure the family inheritance. To aid in the comic complications that follow are his family members Missy and Gitlow, and the plantation owners endearing (but ineffectual) son Charlie. (1963, 99 min.)

Lift Ev’ry Voice Film Festival

Tuesday, July 14, 2pm
Quilombo – Screening & Discussion

Tuesday, July 28, 2pm
Xica da Silva – Screening & Discussion

Tuesday, August 4, 2pm
Gone are the Days! – Screening & Discussion

August 11, 2pm
One Potato, Two Potato – Screening & Discussion

Faith and Freedom, An Ecumenical Celebration

August 2 – August 9
Faith and Freedom, An Ecumenical Celebration  lev4

Across Berkshire County
presented by LEV, partners tba

To celebrate 150 years of all people in the United States being free, Lift Ev’ry Voice is asking people of all faiths to sponsor sermons, lectures, programs, concerts and other activities that talk about the role of faith in advancing both personal and societal freedom. Activities submitted will be posted on our website at liftevryvoice.com.

Making Peace Today

August 5, time tba
Making Peace Today  lev4

South County, tba
presented by LEV, partners tba

Lift Ev’ry Voice recognizes that Peace and Life are values that transcend differences across cultures and nationalities. 192,020 is the estimate of how many people died with the first nuclear bombing of Hiroshima on August 5, 1945. On the anniversary of that event, the Festival hosts an event bringing together people from across the Berkshires, to talk about Making Peace Today, both here in the United States and across the world. Program and participants still being determined.

Who Am I

September 4
“WhoAm I” Art Exhibition lev4

Lichtenstein Center for the Arts, 28 Renne Ave, Pittsfield
presented by LEV, Massachuestts College of Liberal Arts, Mass Humanities

“Who Am I”, an art exhibition celebrating the work and artistry of Lift Ev’ry Voice’s eLEVate participants. The exhibition displays the multidisciplinary works created by youth during the 2015 Lift Ev’ry Voice Festival.

“Who Am I”, eLEVate Closing Ceremony

August 8, 5-7P
“Who Am I”, Project eLEVate Closing Ceremony   lev4

Lichtenstein Center for the Arts, 28 Renne Ave, Pittsfield
presented by LEV, Massachuestts College of Liberal Arts, Mass Humanities

Reception for Project eLEVate participants celebrating their completion of the summer program and their art on display in the exhibition, “Who Am I”.  The reception includes an awards ceremony for project participants.  All are invited to attend the reception and certificate ceremony.

Lift Ev’ry Voice Film Festival – One Potato, Two Potato

August 11, 2P
Lift Ev’ry Voice Film Festival at the Berkshire Museum – One Potato, Two Potato  lev4

at the Berkshire Museum, 39 South St, Pittsfield
presented by LEV, Berkshire Museum, Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at BCC

Free. Donations accepted.

This is the fourth of four film screenings and talkbacks with historian and filmmaker, Don Quinn Kelley, Ph.D., Co-chair, Lift Ev’ry Voice. One Potato, Two Potato looks at interracial marriage in the 1960’s, three years before the Supreme Court made illegal any laws outlawing interracial marriage. A white divorcée falls in love with and marries an African American man. When her ex-husband sues for custody of her child, arguing that a mixed household is an improper place to raise the girl, the new husband fights for his parental rights in court, fighting against a judge who represents the prejudices of the era. (1964, 83 min.)

Lift Ev’ry Voice Film Festival

Tuesday, July 14, 2pm
Quilombo – Screening & Discussion

Tuesday, July 28, 2pm
Xica da Silva – Screening & Discussion

Tuesday, August 4, 2pm
Gone are the Days! – Screening & Discussion

August 11, 2pm
One Potato, Two Potato – Screening & Discussion

First to Freedom: Celebrating Elizabeth Freeman

August 22, 1-4:30P
First to Freedom: Celebrating Elizabeth Freeman

Ashley House, 117 Cooper Road, Ashley Falls/Sheffield MA
presented by LEV, MultiCultural Bridge, Trustees of Reservations

Slavery began to crumble in Massachusetts when Elizabeth “Mumbet” Freeman successfully sued for her freedom from slavery and did it more than 80 years before the Emancipation Proclamation.

ashleyhouse

On Saturday, August 22nd, from 1-4:30PM, the Trustees will host an afternoon of activities to celebrate and illuminate the story of Elizabeth Freeman at the Ashley House in Sheffield, MA. Activities will include guided tours of the Ashley House, presentations of new artwork featuring Elizabeth Freeman by youth from the Berkshire’s Multicultural Bridge, and a performance by storyteller an actress Tammy Denease with her dramatic re-telling of “Mum Bet’s Story.” Readings from the recently released anthology, “Berkshire Mosaic, “will also be featured. Refreshments will be served.

The Colonel John Ashley House—where Elizabeth Freeman was enslaved—was built in 1735 and is the oldest house still standing in the Berkshires. It came into the care and protection of the Trustees, the nation’s oldest statewide land conservation organization, over forty years ago. With it came one of the most incredible stories of liberty and freedom to come out of Massachusetts: The intertwined lives of Colonel John Ashley, a patriot and author of the Sheffield Resolves – a pre-revolutionary petition against British tyranny and manifesto for individual rights – and Elizabeth Freeman, an African-American woman enslaved in the Ashley home and who was inspired by that same manifesto.

It was while she was there in the Ashley household, that Freeman first overheard the ideals of freedom and equality then compelling the American Revolution through conversations between Colonel Ashley and his political colleagues. She eventually sued with an argument based on those founding ideals, and that set a legal precedent that would ultimately help end slavery as an institution in Massachusetts.

The Ashley House is also open for tours during July and August on Saturdays and Sundays at 1PM and 2PM or for groups at other times by appointment. Or check out a self-guided exhibit in the Interpretive Center next to the house, which is open daily. Visitors can also walk the trails of nearby Bartholomew’s Cobble, a National Natural Landmark and which was once owned by Col. Ashley. For an online, virtual exhibit about Elizabeth Freeman, visit: http://bit.ly/1k5PqiR